Jul 102012
 

Jane Falter and I met each other over a cup of coffee about a year ago, and we’ve been good friends since. A plethora of initials follow her name, including ACRW, SPHR, and CPC.

Jane is a career coach and certified résumé writer who is passionate about helping individuals identify and achieve what’s next. Here’s what’s on Jane’s  mind this month.

“Are you in a job search? If so, could negative thinking be holding you back?

I’m surprised at the number of clients who tend to focus on what they don’t have, rather than what they do. For example, many worry about age. One client was over sixty; I understood why she’s concerned about finding work. But when another expressed her concerns because she was forty, it became obvious that many obstacles are in our heads.

Instead of focusing on what you don’t have, give more thought on how your perceived negative could be a positive—to the right employer.”

Visit Jane at http://www.JaneFalter.com.

 

 

May 142012
 

Jane Falter and I met each other over a cup of coffee about a year ago, and we’ve been good friends since. A plethora of initials follow her name, including ACRW, SPHR, and CPC. Jane is a career coach and certified résumé writer who is passionate about helping individuals identify and achieve what’s next.  Here’s what is on Jane’s mind this month.

“Are you looking for a job? Then, don’t forget LinkedIn. It’s the place for professional networking. In fact, many recruiters and companies use LinkedIn to find candidates instead of placing openings on Monster, Indeed, and other sites. Post your profile, but also network to make the most of this important site. Make LinkedIn a part of your career toolbox.”

Visit Jane at http://www.JaneFalter.com.

 

Mar 252012
 

Jane Falter and I met each other over a cup of coffee about a year ago, and we’ve been good friends since. A plethora of initials follow her name, including ACRW, SPHR, and CPC. Jane is a career coach and certified résumé writer who is passionate about helping individuals identify and achieve what’s next. Here’s Jane’s career tip for this month:

“Create a “Me” file. In it, place copies of appreciation letters/cards, testimonies, and bits of papers that remind you of your accomplishments. You’ll then have all the information you need for filling out your next performance review, creating your resume, developing goals, asking for a raise, and most importantly boosting your ego when you’re feeling down.”

You can visit Jane at http://www.JaneFalter.com.

 

Jan 302012
 

More than twenty years ago, I was appointed general manager of a large public relations firm and charged with building the Atlanta office. Although I did my best to cover it up, I lived in constant fear I might fail.

Uneasy in my new role, I became hypervigiliant. Something as simple as an employee’s suggestion that we do something in a different way felt like a direct assault on my authority. I heard the employee’s suggestion as a criticism that I was not good enough.

Once I became more self-aware and comfortable with myself and my abilities, I began to operate from a place of attunement. I was more relaxed and receptive. My desire was to know, understand, communicate and connect. I was no longer threatened by suggestions.  Instead, I welcomed them.

When we are attuned, we resonate with ourselves and other people. We seek connection over safety.

To find attunement, we must first be attuned to ourselves. The journey toward connection challenges us to become more self-aware. By shifting from hypervigilance to attunement, we own our feelings, become more open and receptive, and pave the way for authentic communication.

Sep 262011
 

My girlfriend “Martha” goes on and on. Her stories are so jammed with unimportant details that it’s hard not to lose interest. In college, we used to interrupt her mid-story and ask for the “Cliffs Note” version. Thirty years later, we’ve given up; we just tune her out.

Being brief is a challenge for many of us, and no where is it more important to be brief than in business. Author Ron Hoff shows us how to get our point across clearly and succinctly in his little book Say It in Six: How to Say Exactly What You Mean in Six Minutes or Less.

One: “Let’s get right to the point.  Here’s what we need to discuss….” (30 seconds)

Two: “Here’s a quick overview of the situation….” (60 seconds)

Three: “This lead to an idea….” (120 seconds)  Make the idea tangible by holding up something that they can touch – a model, storyboard, color proposal, or something!

Four: “This idea will more than pay for itself. Here’s the payoff….” (120 seconds)

Five: ”Here’s what we need from you to get going….” (30 seconds)  Tell your audience it’s their decision to make, and you want to hear what they think about your idea.